NSU Seeks Director for new RiverHawks Scholar Program


NSU Seeks Director for new RiverHawks Scholar Program

Overview of Position:

This is a full time 12-month position with full University benefits. The RiverHawks Scholar Director Position will create, apply, and oversee all activities and staff of the program.

Overview of Program:

The RiverHawks Scholar Program at Northeastern State University is a four-year, fully inclusive certificate program for students with mild/mild moderate intellectual and/or developmental disabilities. The RiverHawks Scholar Program focuses on helping students gain knowledge and enhance their capabilities in the following areas:
● Independent Living
● Social Skills
● Academics
● Career Development

For additional details, or to apply, visit NSU’s Human Resources site.

 

Inclusive Summer Camps


Inclusive Summer Camps

Looking for something to do this summer? The following agencies welcome individuals with developmental disabilities to their summer camps! Click on the logo to find out more. Let us know if you know of others so we can include them here!

Happy summer!

 

Tulsa Area

 

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Oklahoma

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Apache Tribe Cultural Camp & EPA Camp

Camp Grey Squirrel


Surrounding States

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National

talisman_summer_camps

 

Looking for other recreational opportunities during the summer or school year? Check out the National Inclusion Project! They partner with organizations around the country that are intentionally reaching out to their communities to include children with disabilities in their recreation programs.

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College Is Possible!


College is Possible!

We are happy to celebrate good news from LeadLearnLive today! They have announced an agreement with Northeastern State University to provide the first four-year, fully-integrate, comprehensive post-secondary program in Oklahoma for students with intellectual or developmental disabilities, beginning fall of 2018.

Oklahoma is one of two states without a post-secondary program to support students with I/DD. Since 2012, LeadLearnLive has worked tirelessly educating, gathering support, and fundraising to provide a program in our state. The new program will be located in Tahlequah and be based on REACH, a program of the College of Charleston in South Carolina. We encourage parents of high school students with I/DD to sign up for LeadLearnLive’s email list so you can be the first to know of upcoming details.

Visit Facebook to congratulate LeadLearnLive and thank NSU for their support!66p96a0g tgipromowebclientlogosnsu43

 

2018 Shot In The Dark Golf Tournament – May The Fourth Be With You!

2018-sitd-logo-verticalTo enter the tournament or sign up for a sponsorship, please click HERE.

The 23rd annual Shot In The Dark Golf Tournament on Friday, May 4, will have an enhanced Star Wars theme in 2018 as it proclaims to all participants, “May The Fourth Be With You!”

New this year will be a twilight tee off time of 8:30 p.m. at MeadowBrook Country Club in Tulsa.

In addition to the tournament, golfers will be feted with dinner, live music with Terry & Breanna, $10,000 prize putting contest, silent auction, and closest-to-the-pin contest with prizes.

This unique tournament is played at night with glow-in-the-dark balls and LED glow sticks marking tee boxes and holes. Golfers will tee off in teams of four at the 8:30 p.m. shotgun start. All holes are reset to par three and the golfers navigate the course playing nine holes. The dinner and putting contest will be held from 6:30 until 8:30 p.m. and  the silent auction from 6:30 p.m. through the tournament awards ceremony.

All proceeds from the TARC Shot in the Dark Golf Tournament are used to support programs and services helping individuals with developmental disabilities and their families with needs such as special education assistance, multi-age support groups, self-advocacy and social skills training, as well as loss and grief support.

The tournament entry fee* for foursomes is $400. The number of teams is limited and will be accepted on a first-come-first-served basis. Tournament entrants are encouraged to come decorated with glow paraphernalia. The best glowing team will be awarded a prize.

Tournament sponsorships* are still available.

Presenting Sponsor – $10,000
4 foursomes
4 hole signs with company logo
Recognition in publicity/marketing materials
Full page ad in tournament program

Eagle Sponsor – $5,000
3 foursomes
3 hole signs with company logo
Recognition in publicity/marketing materials
3/4 page ad in tournament program

Classic Sponsor – $2,500
2 foursomes
2 hole signs with company logo
Recognition in publicity/marketing materials
1/2 page ad in tournament program

Dinner Sponsor – $1,500
1 foursome
1 hole sign with company logo
Recognition in publicity/marketing materials
1/4 page ad in tournament program

Invitational Sponsor – $1,000
Glow Sponsor – $1,000
1 foursome
1 hole sign with company logo
Recognition in publicity/marketing materials
1/4 page ad in tournament program

$10,000 Putting Contest Sponsor – $500
1 hole sign with company logo
Recognition in publicity/marketing materials

Hole Sponsor – $250
1 hole sign with company logo
Recognition in publicity/marketing materials

To enter the tournament or sign up for a sponsorship, please click HERE.

 

*Entry/Sponsorship fees minus goods and services are tax deductible. No refunds.

2018-sitd-flyer

 

27th Annual Advocacy Awards

TARC held its 27th Annual Advocacy Awards & Volunteer Recognition ceremony at the Southern Hills Marriott in Tulsa on Dec. 7. More than 250 guests gathered in the ballroom for entertainment from duo Branjae and Scott, the opportunity to participate in a silent auction, dinner, and the main program.

KOTV “Six In The Morning” personality LeAnne Taylor served as master of ceremonies and Joey Travolta was the keynote speaker. James and Joseph Meadours received the lifetime achievement award for their years of committed advocacy to people with developmental disabilities. Long-time volunteers were also recognized for their service and awards were given to advocates committed to ensuring a high quality of life for individuals with developmental disabilities and their families.

 

Advocacy Award winners, OK AIM service award recipients, Lifetime Achievement Award recipient James Meadours and keynote speaker Joey Travolta
Advocacy Award winners
Lifetime Achievement Award recipient James Meadours
Lifetime Achievement Award recipient James Meadours

 

Emcee LeAnne Taylor
Emcee LeAnne Taylor
Silent Auction
Silent Auction
Keynote Speaker - Joey Travolta
Keynote Speaker – Joey Travolta

2017 TARC Advocacy Award Winners Announced

Winners of the 2017 TARC Advocacy Awards have been selected. These winners and others who have provided outstanding service to Oklahomans with developmental disabilities will be honored and recognized at the 27th Annual Advocacy Awards and Volunteer Recognition event on Thursday, Dec. 7 at the Marriott Southern Hills Hotel in Tulsa.

The event will include keynote speaker Joey Travolta who will share his passion for helping students with  intellectual and developmental disabilities develop self-esteem, confidence, and creativity through acting and digital film making.

In addition, the prestigious Lifetime Achievement Award will be presented to brothers James and Joe Meadours, pioneering self-advocates who more than 20 years ago were instrumental in organizing the first People First program in Oklahoma and have gone on to earn national acclaim for their support of self-advocacy throughout the U.S.

Master of ceremonies for this year’s event will be KOTV’s “6 In The Morning” personality LeAnne Taylor.

For more information, please call 918-582-TARC (8272) or 800-688-TARC (8272).

 

This year’s Advocacy Award winners are:

  • Advocate – Board Member – Terry Trego (Woodward)
    Recognizes a member of the board of directors of any non-profit, community based service provider who has gone beyond the interest of his or her agency to become an advocate for all people with disabilities.
  • Advocate – Case Manager – Sonya Rios (Tulsa)
    Recognizes the OKDHS/DDS case manager who has surpassed job requirements to advocate for his or her clients.
  • Advocate – Direct Care Provider – Kerrie White (Noble)
    Recognizes the direct contact staff person working for a community provider, who has gone beyond job requirements to advocate for people with disabilities.
  • Advocate – Educator – Carolyn Piguet (Vinita)
    Recognizes a public school educator who has promoted the inclusion of children with disabilities in regular school settings.
  • Advocate – Professional Provider – Kim Wotring (Tulsa)
    Recognizes any professional such as a therapist or physician who advocates for people with disabilities beyond their professional responsibilities.
  • Advocate – Volunteer – Helen Taylor (Tulsa)
    Recognizes the volunteer or group of volunteers who, in a program serving people with developmental disabilities, has gone beyond the call of duty to advocate.
  • Self-Advocate – Donald Smalley (Vinita)
    Recognizes the self-advocate who has spoken out for all people with disabilities.
  • Media Advocate – OK Watch (Norman)
    Recognizes the media professional who has effectively promoted better understanding and integration of people with disabilities living in the community.
  • Parent Advocate – Erica Herrera (Oklahoma City)
    Recognizes the parent(s) of a person with developmental disabilities who has been a voice for all people with disabilities.
  • Special Achievement in Advocacy – Individual – Ed Long (Oklahoma City)
    Recognizes the individual, business, or organization not included in other categories, which through a significant advocacy effort has improved the lives of people with disabilities.
  • Special Achievement in Advocacy – Group – True Blue Neighbors – (Tulsa)
    Recognizes the individual, business, or organization not included in other categories, which through a significant advocacy effort has improved the lives of people with disabilities.
  • Catalyst of Change – Judith Leitner (Oklahoma City)
    Recognizes individuals, groups or  organizations that have been catalysts for significant positive change in improving the lives of Oklahomans with developmental disabilities over a long period of time.
  • Catalyst of Change – Jenifer Randle (Oklahoma City)
    Recognizes individuals, groups or  organizations that have been catalysts for significant positive change in improving the lives of Oklahomans with developmental disabilities over a long period of time.

2017 Advocacy Awards tickets now available

We invite you to join TARC in recognizing those who have provided outstanding service and advocacy for Oklahomans with developmental disabilities and for dinner on Thursday, Dec. 7, 2017 at the Marriott Southern Hills Hotel, 1902 East 71st Street, in Tulsa beginning at 6 p.m.

Joey Travolta
Joey Travolta

The TARC Advocacy Awards & Volunteer Recognition will include keynote speaker Joey Travolta who will share his passion for helping students with  intellectual and developmental disabilities develop self-esteem, confidence, and creativity through acting and digital film making.

In addition, the prestigious Lifetime Achievement Award will be presented to brothers James and Joe Meadours, pioneering self-advocates who more than 20 years ago were instrumental in organizing the first People First program in Oklahoma and have gone on to earn national acclaim for their support of self-advocacy throughout the U.S.

Master of ceremonies for this year’s event will be KOTV’s “6 In The Morning” personality LeAnne Taylor.

LeAnne Taylor
LeAnne Taylor

For more information, please call 918-582-TARC (8272) or 800-688-TARC (8272).

Please RSVP/purchase tickets no later than Nov. 30.

Please click HERE to RSVP and/or purchase guest/general admission tickets for the 2017 TARC Advocacy Awards & Volunteer Recognition presentation and dinner.

Awards will be given in the following categories:

Advocate – Case Manager
Recognizes the OKDHS/DDSD case manager who has surpassed job requirements to advocate for his or her clients.

Advocate – Direct Care Provider
Recognizes the direct contact staff person working for a community provider, who has gone beyond job requirements to advocate for people with disabilities.

Advocate – Educator
Recognizes a public school educator who has promoted the inclusion of children with disabilities in regular school settings.

Advocate – Professional Provider
Recognizes any professional such as a therapist or physician who advocates for people with disabilities beyond their professional responsibilities.

Advocate – Volunteer
Recognizes the volunteer or group of volunteers who, in a program serving people with developmental disabilities, has gone beyond the call of duty to advocate.

Self-Advocate
Recognizes the self-advocate who has spoken out for all people with disabilities.

Media Advocate
Recognizes the media professional who has effectively promoted better understanding and integration of people with disabilities living in the community.

Advocate – Board Member
Recognizes a member of the board of directors of any non-profit, community based service provider who has gone beyond the interest of his or her agency to become an advocate for all people with disabilities.

Parent Advocate
Recognizes the parent(s) of a person with developmental disabilities who has been a voice for all people with disabilities.

Special Achievement in Advocacy
Recognizes the individual, business, or organization not included in other categories, which through a significant advocacy effort has improved the lives of people with disabilities.

Catalyst of Change
Recognizes individuals, groups or organizations that have been catalysts for significant positive change in improving the lives of Oklahomans with developmental disabilities over a long period of time.

TARC selected for national special educational advocacy curriculum project

special-education-1TARC is one of 10 chapters of The Arc of the U.S. selected to participate in a pilot project to create a training curriculum that will be used nationally to train parents and others how to effectively advocate for special education services. TARC was chosen for the project largely because of their more than 20 years of experience and expertise in doing effective special education advocacy.

Sherilyn Walton, TARC’s Family Support Coordinator, provides this service and is well regarded by schools and parents for her expertise. She is a licensed clinical social worker and was a general and special education teacher for several years. As a result, she not only understands the laws affecting special education and what is required, but also  can relate well with school personnel.

“We are honored and excited to have been chosen to participate in this important project and lend our knowledge and expertise in the development of this national training curriculum,” said TARC Executive Director John Gajda. “Training others on how to be effective advocates for special education services fits perfectly with our philosophy on advocacy. Sherilyn not only attends meetings with parents, she teaches them how to be effective advocates so they can continue to advocate for their child throughout their school experience,” he added.

The special education advocacy training curriculum developed by this pilot project will be specifically designed for the nearly 700 state and local chapters of The Arc to help prepare chapter staff to effectively train parents and others to advocate on behalf of students with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD) in special education matters. The training curriculum will discuss how the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) and Section 504 programs apply to individual students participating in these programs as well as advocacy strategies to address potential concerns at each step of the special education process to ensure students receive a “free and appropriate public education.”

Thanks to funding from TAUW and generous donors, special education advocacy services provided by TARC are available to families in the six counties (Tulsa, Creek, Okmulgee, Osage, Rogers and Wagoner) served by TAUW. TARC has provided this service in 79 public schools and three charter schools in 17 separate school districts. For more information on this service and others     provided by TARC, call  (918) 582-TARC (8272).

Nominations for 2017 Advocacy Awards Now Accepted

Once each year, TARC recognizes those who have provided outstanding service and advocacy for Oklahomans with developmental disabilities. Please take time now to nominate one or more individuals/organizations you believe should be recognized for their efforts in helping others. Winners of the 27th Annual TARC Advocacy Awards will be announced at the awards presentation on Taa-27th-anniversary-4-rgbhursday, Dec. 7 at the Marriott Hotel Southern Hills in Tulsa.

There are 13 categories (see list below) in which nominees can be considered for an award. Anyone can nominate advocates for an award. Each recipient in this category has done something remarkable in helping to achieve TARC’s mission of ensuring a high quality of life for Oklahomans with developmental disabilities and their families.

Award Categories:

  • Advocate – Board Member
    Recognizes a member of the board of directors of any non-profit, community based service provider who has gone beyond the interest of his or her agency to become an advocate for all people with disabilities.
  • Advocate – Case Manager
    Recognizes the OKDHS/DDS case manager who has surpassed job requirements to advocate for his or her clients.
  • Advocate – Direct Care Provider
    Recognizes the direct contact staff person working for a community provider, who has gone beyond job requirements to advocate for people with disabilities.
  • Advocate – Educator
    Recognizes a public school educator who has promoted the inclusion of children with disabilities in regular school settings.
  • Advocate – Professional Provider
    Recognizes any professional such as a therapist or physician who advocates for people with disabilities beyond their professional responsibilities.
  • Advocate – Volunteer
    Recognizes the volunteer or group of volunteers who, in a program serving people with developmental disabilities, has gone beyond the call of duty to advocate.
  • Elected Official
    Recognizes an elected official who has effectively promoted better understanding and integration of people with disabilities in employment, education, and the community.
  • Self-Advocate
    Recognizes the self-advocate who has spoken out for all people with disabilities.
  • Media Advocate
    Recognizes the media professional who has effectively promoted better understanding and integration of people with disabilities living in the community.
  • Parent Advocate
    Recognizes the parent(s) of a person with developmental disabilities who has been a voice for all people with disabilities.
  • Special Achievement in Advocacy
    Recognizes the individual, business, or organization not included in other categories, which through a significant advocacy effort has improved the lives of people with disabilities.
  • Catalyst of Change
    Recognizes individuals, groups or  organizations that have been catalysts for significant positive change in improving the lives of Oklahomans with developmental disabilities over a long period of time.
  • Shelby Hard Courage in Advocacy
    Recognizes individuals who have faced extreme challenges while still advocating for others.

TARC reserves the right to withhold an award in any category in which an insufficient number of qualified nominations are submitted. A selection committee composed of prominent Oklahoma advocates in the field of developmental disabilities will make the final decision on Advocacy Award winners.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Join The Fight for People with I/DD and Their Families!

rally“We are in the fight of our lives” is how Peter Burns, Executive Director of The Arc of the U.S. characterized the proposed federal government changes to Medicaid that would strip $800 billion from the program that largely funds all states’ home and community-based supports for people with developmental disabilities.

As disastrous as those potential changes at the federal level are, TARC, an affiliated chapter of The Arc, has been deeply concerned about the devastating effects of recent and proposed budget cuts by the State of Oklahoma on services and safeguards for people with developmental disabilities.

As a result, TARC is ramping up its public policy advocacy efforts to more effectively work with Oklahoma legislators and other influential decision makers to support legislation and funding that will assist individuals with developmental disabilities to have a better quality of life.

To assist with these efforts, TARC received a $15,000 challenge grant from The Anne and Henry Zarrow Foundation to help further the agency’s efforts to advocate for people with developmental disabilities.

The grant is helping fund a Public Policy Coordinator leading TARC’s public policy agenda by assisting in identifying emerging issues and helping craft agency’s public policy agenda, interacting with interested and committed individuals and coalitions to develop and implement action steps to address these issues, cultivating and mobilizing grassroots advocates in support of the agenda, and communicating TARC’s issues and priorities as a public speaker in the community.

Join the fight! Additional help is needed. You can assist our advocacy efforts by becoming a TARC member. All membership fees will be used to support public policy advocacy by TARC staff as they reach out to decision makers at the State Capitol. Members, in turn, will be assisted by the agency in their own outreach efforts to communicate their desires to their elected representatives to provide the necessary funding for the critical needs of Oklahomans with developmental disabilities.